What’s News -GMF May Up its Speeding Fines and Court Costs- Rick Langenberg

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If you get caught for speeding when driving in the lower Ute Pass, you should hope that you are snagged by a Green Mountain Falls Police officer.

Although you still might get a hefty fine, you will get off cheaper than if you are cited by a Colorado State trooper or by a sheriff deputy.

But unfortunately, the GMF lower fee reprieve may be ending shortly, so plan your speeding and law-breaking escapades accordingly. In other words, think twice about speeding or exercising careless driving antics in GMF in the near future.

This scenario was presented by GMF Attorney Matt Krob during a presentation before the GMF Board of Trustees last week. Krob told the board that the time is ripe for the town to alter some of its fees and to change its court procedures. He indicated that these changes could involve an increase in speeding fines, with surcharges that are more in line with other agencies. “It is cheaper to get caught speeding through Green Mountain Falls if you caught by the marshal than by the state police,” related Krob.

Green Mountain Falls Police Chief Tim Bradley, though, said he wasn’t advocating raising fees, but believes some adjustments should occur. “I am not asking to match the state,” said Bradley.

But in any case, Krob wants GMF leaders to consider limiting its municipal court operations by changing to a default system. Under this procedure, the town would operate more like a civil court and would enter judgements against violators who don’t comply or pay up. That way, it won’t get so hung up on issuing bench warrants for law violators who don’t show up for court or pay their fines. Krob said he wants to limit the time he spend in overseeing municipal court matters.

According to Krob, the current system Is archaic and relies on the prospects of delinquent criminals will “get popped” in order for the town retrieve its money.

What’s News
GMF may up its speeding fines and court costs
Rick Langenberg

If you get caught for speeding when driving in the lower Ute Pass, you should hope that you are snagged by a Green Mountain Falls Police officer.

Although you still might get a hefty fine, you will get off cheaper than if you are cited by a Colorado State trooper or by a sheriff deputy.

But unfortunately, the GMF lower fee reprieve may be ending shortly, so plan your speeding and law-breaking escapades accordingly. In other words, think twice about speeding or exercising careless driving antics in GMF in the near future.

This scenario was presented by GMF Attorney Matt Krob during a presentation before the GMF Board of Trustees last week. Krob told the board that the time is ripe for the town to alter some of its fees and to change its court procedures. He indicated that these changes could involve an increase in speeding fines, with surcharges that are more in line with other agencies. “It is cheaper to get caught speeding through Green Mountain Falls if you caught by the marshal than by the state police,” related Krob.

Green Mountain Falls Police Chief Tim Bradley, though, said he wasn’t advocating raising fees, but believes some adjustments should occur. “I am not asking to match the state,” said Bradley.

But in any case, Krob wants GMF leaders to consider limiting its municipal court operations by changing to a default system. Under this procedure, the town would operate more like a civil court and would enter judgements against violators who don’t comply or pay up. That way, it won’t get so hung up on issuing bench warrants for law violators who don’t show up for court or pay their fines. Krob said he wants to limit the time he spend in overseeing municipal court matters.

According to Krob, the current system Is archaic and relies on the prospects of delinquent criminals will “get popped” in order for the town retrieve its money.

Under a default system, he said the town will receive more bang for its buck. And if a person doesn’t pay their fine, then they lose their license, or don’t get it back.

The town will hold a work session on Dec. 15 at 6 p.m. to further discuss its court situation and to review its fines.